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's speech. the question this morning, does new technology create better jobs? we will show you the opinion piece that is prompting our question. here are a couple of ways to participate in the discussion, as usual. by phone -- make sure you mute your television or radio when you call in. you can reach us on twitter or facebook. or send journal@c-span.org us an e-mail, the e-mail address is -- or send us an e-mail, the address is journal@c-span.org. the front page this morning of t,"e washington pos the headline -- part of the reporting this morning area did president obama will be speaking on the actual anniversary day at the lincoln memorial. that is coming up on wednesday. here's the front page of the new york times and their front page photo from the march yesterday -- e froml play you mor that. comeshnology and jobs, it in an opinion peas from "the new york times," written by two economics professors. they write -- the unemployment rate is stuck at levels not seen since the early 1990s. the portion of adults working is four percentage points below its peak in 2000. our question to you
unfree. and over some number of decades became much for your and much were democratic. >> does technology eventually make democracy inevitable? >> one of the observations that we can with actually came from me and mark. we were in the mr a little over a month ago, less than 1% as access to the unit. one of the worst decade shift in the entire world. now it's in some country and session. still very much speculative about whether its democratic transition. what was interesting about myanmar and perhaps something that shocked even us is even the less than 1% of the population has access to the internet everyone had heard of it. they understood the unit as a set of values, as a concept as an id even before they experienced it as a user or a tool. the understanding was not based on a chinese interpretation but it was not based on autocrats version. they understood in terms of its western value of the free flow of information and civil liberties. what that means to us is your 57% of the world's population living under some kind of an autocracy. what happens when they try to create an autocratic
mostly by how different things are now. the technology is such a you can get a flash mob to show up if you want but 1963 you get 200,000 people back to the mall and you would be below horned. organizing was remarkable and that to me -- i would like people to understand the enormity of that. >> a very short time a group of people came together because they believe in something. and they put together the most unbelievable moment in american history. >> on the march on washington to go forward but the young people who want to be journalists tuesday that they have an obligation to cover poverty, to cover race, to go deeper and find the real story. >> we are missing the pbs video documentary on the march tonight because we would rather be here. >> will be on line. >> look at it and see the people that came to the march. these are ordinary men and women dressed like they are going to church and they believe they are going to church. >> i think that the world came together around an idea that all men, and we soon added women and children, gay lesbian and children are created equal so it cr
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for work? automation and technology make it so that in fact we need fewer human hands in a bunch of arenas where we used to so that means we have to think about work quite differently and about the society needs for the contribution. and i think that we will have our best chance at getting to some of those changes if we have a really fully multiracial, multi justice movement and that is explicit about race and the way that gordon has mentioned that engages everybody that has a stake in taking their racial order a part. the changing demographics of america present such an opportunity for us. we are coming into a period that we can redefine what it means to be american because for too long that has been a title that has been captured and owned by white folks. and many of us that have been here for 200, 300 years, since the very beginning since before there were white folks, you know, it really is not feeling like we were american. we were the other. so we are in a moment where we are getting ready to actually calotte back and own what it means to be american and i think from that will come a
nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. [ male announcer ] over the last 100 years, tennis has gotten a lot less dainty, rackets less splintery, courts more surfacey. technology made the game a whole lot faster and awesomer. it's kind of like how esurance used technology to build a car insurance company for the modern world. advantage, you. let's give it up for the modern world. [ crowd cheering ] [ male announcer ] or...that works. esurance. proud sponsor of the u.s. open. check out esurance on facebook. >>> i walked through that door, dr. king said, oh, you're the boy from troy. are you john louis? and i said dr. king, i am john robert louis. so from that moment on he started calling me the boy from troy. >> john robert louis was 23 years old when he spoke at the lincoln memorial 50 years ago today. at that moment, congressman louis recalled how he felt that day and what the march on washington meant for american history. >> this is all of us
, in technology, that never happens. happened to the stock market value angered investors. it was worth over $500 billion. apple's was worth just 15 billion and google hadn't even made its stock market debut. today, apple is way ahead, worth over 450 billion and google's value has outstripped that of microsoft. its shares per up on the news of ballmer's and. last autumn, the embattled chief executive told me he was not complacent. >> everybody will always say that there is a chance to do better in any company. we will continue to work hard as a company to improve. >> for all of his enthusiasm, windows eight and the new surface tablet have not really excited consumers. now, microsoft is looking for a new boss who can point the company towards a more innovative future. >> the search is on at microsoft. starting tomorrow, a series of events will be held to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. martin luther king delivered his famous i have a dream speech. from coast-to-coast, there are many murals bearing king's image. one photographer has spent the last 30 years traveling across ame
not only assad has access to chemical agents. >> the missile technology being discovered at this time, but these weapons are not difficult to manufacturer. >> reporter: syrian state tv is reporting chemical weapons have been found in a neighborhood and russia says assad must allow u.n. inspectors visit the site of the attack, but there seems real little movement in moscow's stance. >> there is no indication if the western countries or a coalition even in the limited way, there is no indication russia might be even slightly cooperative this time. >> reporter: the u.n. disarmament chief has arrive in syria and is trying to negotiate access for inspectors to visit the site. >> joining us now is steven cornish an executive director with doctors without borders. can you tell us what is the significance of seeing patience with neurotoxic symptoms. what are they and can you confirm what caused them? >> i'm an executive director and not a doctor, i can answer your question. the symptoms range from blurred vision to confusion and in severe state convulsions, paralysis and respiratory failure l
-- >> as a matter of fact, if you look at the timetables -- >> they think they have the technology to make sure these folkings are safe? >> they already have the technology to do that. these cruise missiles could launch from 1,500 miles away. that's not the issue. it's clear then, wherever those u.n. inspectors are, which probably would be pretty close to regime targets, that those are not going to be the targets. if, in fact, those air strikes begin within the next couple of days. which is what we're hearing. >> all right. jim miklaszewski at the pentagon. it's going to be a long holiday weekend, thank you, sir. >>> with lawmakers on reset till next week, mostly bit players in the drama surrounding syria. joining me now, democratic member of the armed services committee. senator, i want to begin with the fact that you've got democratic colleagues from connecticut, john larson on the house side, longtime member of house leadership there. your senate colleague, chris murphy. all believing that congress should play a larger role. not just consultation, but a larger role. what say you? >> i say th
graders less than half will graduate high school. in this day and age in particular with technology being so prevalent one must have certain skills that you receive through a formal education to have a job and keep a job. so my focus has been on making sure these children who are predominantly poor or minority are a priority for us and particularly in the elementary school years. we can't afford to have up 240% of elementary school students be chronically truant. that's a focus for me. >> right now the head of the naacp is speaking. let's listen. >> somewhere along the way white sheets were traded for white but don't down shirts. attack dogs and water hoses were traded for tasers and widespread implementation of stop-and-frisk policies. nooses were traded for handcuffs. somewhere along the way we gain new enemies, cynicism and complacency. murders from urban america to suburban america. the pursuit of power for power's sake. we stand here today to say it is time to wake up. so here in 2013 we stand before the statue of the great emancipator. we look towards the statue of the great liberat
's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. >>> the march to complete the dream continues. that's next. even though it's the best idea ever. but dress for success right? so we started using tide, bounce and downy together. it keeps our clothes looking newer longer and like a million bucks oh, maybe we could sell our clothes [ female announcer ] tide, bounce and downy. great on their own, better together ♪ now you can give yourself a kick in the rear! v8 v-fusion plus energy. natural energy from green tea plus fruits and veggies. need a little kick? ooh! could've had a v8. in the juice aisle. need a little kick? ooh! how can i help you? oh, you're real? you know i'm real! at discover, we're always here to talk. good, 'cause i don't have time for machines. some companies just don't appreciate the power of conversation! you know, i like you! i like you too! at discover, we treat you like you'd treat you. get the it card and talk to a real person. >>> tens of thousands of people gathered today to mark th
the new nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. i don't know. how did you get here? [ speaking in russian ] look, look, look... you probably want to get away as much as we do. with priceline express deals, you can get a fabulous hotel without bidding. think of the rubles you'll save. with one touch, fun in the sun. i like fun. well, that went exactly i as planned.. really? britta olsen is my patient. i spend long hours with her checking her heart rate, administering her medication,
center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. congestion, for the smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the buses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution into the air. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment. >>> in the spotlight tonight, the crisis in syria, president obama says he has not made a decision yet on whether he will order military action in syria, but made the case for a limited strike during an interview with pbs's news hour today. >> when you start to talk about chemical weapons in a country that has the largest stock pile of chemical weapons anywhere, over time their control over the chemical weapons may er ode, where they're known terrorist organizations that have targeted the united states in the past. then there is a prospect, a possibility in which chemical weapons can have devastating effects could be directed at us. and we want to make sure that that does not happen. and
your kids to do well in school. >> i am mostly struck by how different things are now. the technology is such that you can get it -- mob to show up and dance in the middle of pennsylvania avenue if you wanted but to get 253,000 people against the mall, there would be old horns, pulpits, it was remarkable and to me, i would like for young people to understand the enormity of what it took to do that. >> and a very short time, a group of people came together because they believed in something and they put together the most unbelievable moment in american history. >> for the legacy on the march in washington to go or word, to the young people who want to be see thatts, to really they have an obligation to cover poverty, cover race, go deeper to find the real story. >> julian. >> we are missing the pbs video documentary on the march tonight because we have to be here. >> but it will be online. [laughter] the march,came to ordinary men and women dressed like they're going to church because many believe they were going to church. >> andrew. >> the world came together around an idea that all
life and the transplant surgerying with the whole body of technology and development of medicine, cleats cholesterol, we tell that story through my case and laid against the background of my time in public service. and i was uniquely blessed in many respects, obviously, you can never express enough gratitude for a donor or the donor's family. you cannot talk about what i went through and i survived it what without talking about liz, her sister, and my wife. we celebrate our 40th wedding anniversary next week. [applause] i -- when you go through everything we went through as a family, and the only way to go through it is as a family, if at all possible. i wake up every morning with a smile on my face thankful for a new day i never expected to see. and basically what the book is about, it's simon and shuster love it. it's called heart, american medical odyssey. i think it's a pretty good book. it's not political. it has nothing to do with politics. i suppose you could say that all of pry my critics say i never had a heart. [laughter] may want to have that problem -- this challenge
. some lead in industrial and technological revolution. some in world war ii. arlington cemetery, so close to where we are right now, we can hear the whisper of those brave names, sullivan, fernandez. today, 50 million american latinos demand our rights, rights given to us not by the man who fell in philadelphia who themselves are immigrants and children of immigrants. no, the rights are given to us by god. what we demand is simple. first, we are americans. treat us as such, invest in our neighborhoods, our house, our education. second, we demand a vote. tear down the barriers to voting, don't bring us more. finally, and the second-class citizenship of 5 million children in 6 million parents.♪ >> our next two speakers, professor charles ogletree, harvard law school, and chair of the united we dream, sofia campos. >> thank you so much. it is a pleasure being here. let me say this first, i want to salute our first african- american governor elected twice in massachusetts, deval patrick. i want to support the great lawyers from florida who represented the families of trayvon martin, d
it would be a financial collapse like 2009. technology and a fairly high price are leading to a lot of holes drilled and a lot more crude coming on. >> did you say we're less susceptible with what's happening in the middle east? >> yes. >> you don't think what's going on in syria will affect us? >> i don't think if it's contained within syria, and we've had some problems with libya and libyan expert, we'll be okay. if it blows up with global like russia, then all hell can break loose, not a probability but possibility. >> lowest gas prices in three years. >> lowest prices since three years and i think we'll see lower by thanksgiving and christmas. >> thanks so much. >>> members of congress are getting ready for a full showdown over the federal debt limit. treasury secretary jack lew asked congressional leaders to raise the debt ceiling allowing the government to keep borrowing money. lew says the u.s. will hit the debt ceiling in mid october. house speaker john boehner and other republicans say they want spending cuts first. white house officials say th
and maintaining our technological upgradinge are not our roads and our bridges and our transportation systems in our infrastructure, all things that we can afford to do right now and should be doing right now and would put people to work right now -- if we don't do those things, then 20 years from now, already years from now, we will have fallen further and further behind. when we get back to washington, when congress gets back to washington, this is going to be a major debate. this is the same debate we have been having for the last two years. the difference is now the ready coming down here what we should be thinking about is how do we grow an economy so that we are creating a thriving middle class and more ladders of opportunity for those who are willing to work hard to get into the middle class. and my position is going to be that we can have a budget that is sensible, that is not spent on programs that don't work, but it does spend wisely on those things that will help ordinary people succeed. all right? good. -- it is a general mental the turn. this gentleman right here has had his hand
the minimum wage is a terrible idea will be here in a moment. guess which one. targettemp technology delivers a consistent, therapeutic cold to stop pain and start healing. new thermacare® cold wraps. a better way to treat pain. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. andso, if you're sleepingeam in your contact lenses, what you wear to bed is your business. ask about the air optix® contacts so breathable they're approved for up to 30 nights of continuous wear. serious eye problems may occur. ask your doctor and visit airoptix.com for safety information and a free one-month trial. . >>> coming up, a guest on this program convinced me to change my mind on a major issue. i'll tell you what it was
into a school with you want to date books and technology was almost impossible for children of color. and that was revisited again in the 1960s. after the success of getting public accommodations passed, a voting rights act passed. the next big fight in the 1970s was busing, and it was the issue of people who lived in the community when the tax base couldn't support a decent school, which meant you couldn't get into the middle class. the bottom line is that civil rights leaders have always understood, the one way to lever yourself into the middle class is a good education, and access to that was just as important, if not more important, than getting to eat at woolworth's. >> dr. peterson, you're in education and i want to touch on what hillary was talking about. is it when you have economically challenged neighborhoods, you can't run a school system via property tax. that federal money has to be there, if we're going to be equal for all. but how do we get there? >> there's a couple things. we have to look at education, almost the ways in which we're looking at the infrastructure of t
cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. individualization that your body needs. this labor day, don't invest in a mattress until you visit a sleep number store. when we actually lower the sleep number setting to get the sleep number bed to conform to them, it's amazing the transition that you see with people. oh, that feels really good.it's hugging my body. they just look at you like you cured all the problems they've ever had. we hear it all the time: "i didn't know a bed could feel like this." oh yeah. at our biggest sale of the year, every sleep number bed is on sale. queen mattresses now start at just $599. and for one week only, save an incredible 50% on the sleep number limited edition memory foam mattress sets-but only through labor day! the sleep number bed is more than just a mattress. you sleep on it, you'll understand. don't miss the bi
with a lot of new technologies. this is new devices. some of my dj buddies say i am cheating. it is like driving an automatic. >> oh. >> the world has gotten much simpler thanks to technology. why not? i like that. [laughter]. we know we hear you on kiss, three nights a week, right? >> or twice on mondays. actually four times a week, twice a month. >> what i love you studied something entirely different. tell us how powerful it is to follow your passion in life. >> truly a blessing when you can do something you love. it takes my mind off anything else. i am in my whole dj zone. i am going to have to come back when i finish. it is all peace, love, happiness. to influence people and know they are having a good time. >> i have to ask this, one of our followers on twitter loved the fact that your mic was all bl bl bled -- blinged out. >> my microphone has a sleeve on it. it is a sleeve that we longs to a larger mic. anything to draw attention. >> let's see if we can get a whole shot. it looks like a whole "star trek" control board. we love you are hear with us. specialize in old school hip
with bombs, but chemical weapons can only be destroyed with very, very sensitive technology that incinerates them or chemically neutralizes them. you can't drop a bomb on a bunker and expect it to neutralize the capabilities. bomb the bunker and throw them all over the desert and perhaps throw these containers of some agent that could be picked up by somebody and used in a terrorist attack. highly unlikely we will go after the sites themselves that contain the weapons, but we'll probably attack things that allow them to employee these kinds of weapons. things like airfields, like command and control facilities, military headquarters. perhaps airplanes, airfields, those things that would allow the syrian military to employee gas against its citizens. >>> from what you've heard, does this seem like a symbolic attack, or could it actually do some good? >> i think we need to temper our expectations. this is a very limited attack, what's being discussed is a very limited military attack. i think that the best we could hope for is to deter mr. assad from using the chemical weapons again. but it's
technology delivers a consistent, therapeutic cold to stop pain and start healing. new thermacare® cold wraps. a better way to treat pain. >> axelrod: three people are dead and two wounded in a shooting today in lake butler, florida, just west of jacksonville. the first victim was wounded at a trucking company where the gunman used to work. authorities say the gunman then killed the company owner and a worker at the owner's farm before shooting and killing himself. the gunman ha identified as the step-grandfather of nfl running back j.c. spiller. bull run has a special meaning in virginia where the battle of bull run was the first major land battle of the civil war, but this was bull run in virginia today at a drag racing strip in dinwiddie, south of richmond. hundreds of runners doing their best to stay a step ahead of the bulls. no injuries reported. and so far, so good for the infant panda born at the washington zoo yesterday. the unnamed baby looks good, according to zookeepers. they tried to give the cub its first physical exam today, but mom, mei xiang, wouldn't let them get close. they
any cold. i only use new thermacare® cold wraps. targettemp technology delivers a consistent, therapeutic cold to stop pain and start healing. new thermacare® cold wraps. a better way to treat pain. to stop pain and start healing. we provide the exact individualization that your body needs. this labor day, don't invest in a mattress until you visit a sleep number store. once you experience it, there's no going back. oh, yeah! at our biggest sale of the year, every bed is on sale. queen mattresses now start at just $599. and save an incredible 40% on our limited edition memory foam mattress sets. only at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort individualized. is sweatier and messier than my family on the field. so like the nfl i use tide... ...because i'm the equipment manager in this house. that's my tide. what's yours? >>> instant index on saturday night into what brought a virginia woman to tears on her wedding day. not just the wedding itself she was about to walk down the aisle and got the surprise of her life, her brother a soldier in the army who she hadn't seen in
and technology and infrastructure, our borders are now better staffed and better protected than at any time in our nations history. it illegal crossings have dropped to 40-year lows. we also set commonsense immigration priorities with a focus on criminals, national security and public safety threats, repeat offenders, and egregious emigration file leaders. last year, we remote more serious criminals from the united states than at any time in our history. we strengthened our work to combat transnational criminal organizations including those that commit cyber crime and financial fraud, violate international property and prey upon human life. as part of our effort, we established the dhs loop campaign to unify the departments work to fight the worldwide scourge of human trafficking. while important, we still need to make sure that future changes we needed to make further changes to create a more flexible, fair, and focused emigration system. we instructed our immigration agents and officers to use their discretion under current law to not pursue low priority immigration cases. like children b
of technology and the george washington university. to my far right, again, only in geography, andrew young. he was a close aide to dr. martin luther king. he helped organize the march on washington. he was a former congressman, mayor of atlanta, and ambassador to the united nations. he is currently a professor at the andrew young school of policy studies at your estate university. to my left, gwen ifill, reporter and managing editor of pbs's washington week. she has covered seven presidential campaigns, moderated two vice presidential debates. before that, she worked for nbc, the new york times, and the washington post. in this business, she is regarded as one of the best. to my right, julian bond, one of the leaders of the civil rights movement while a student at morehouse college. he helped found the student nonviolent coordinating committee. in 1998, he was elected chairman of the naacp, the national association for the advancement of colored people. he was also elected to the georgia house and senate. he has been a radio and television commentator and is currently a professor at both ameri
to the missile technology being discovered at that time, but these types of chemical weapons are not very, very difficult to manufacture. >> reporter: syrian state tv has had these t.v.'s and said the government has found these chemicals under rebel control. syria's biggest ally russia said syria must cooperate and allow u.n. to visit the sites of last week's apparent. attack. but there is little move from moscow. >> the coalition of the willing once again to intervene in military fashion even in a limited way. there is no indication that russia might even be slightly cooperative this time. >> reporter: barack obama security visors have been meeting at the white house. united nations disarmament chief has arrived in syria and is trying to negotiate access to visit the site. >> christopher stokes is the director general of doctors without borders. he gives us more details on that incident. >> reporter: yes, doctors without borders are working with a whole series of clinics inside of syria, and in this case we're talking about three clinics in particular in and around damascus. with which we've b
and sophistication in targeting technologies. he is with the department of technology. >> let's see how this works. imagine there is a couple out there expecting a baby, and they go on line immediately to look up the word pregnancy. what happens? >> right away they've shared with google that they're interested in pregnancy. so they can add that to the profile and then i start clicking on links. >> with every click powerful marketing companies drop electronic cookies onto our couple's track to record their browsing history, what they looked at and for how long, and how much they spend. some may even link to the couple's real world shopping habits, noting that they purchased a home pregnancy test. ask sudden and suddenly in their e-mails, on their smartphones, on social media sites comes an avalanche of ads for baby strollers, car seats, cribs and much more. >> and all of this could happen before the couple even tells their family that they're pregnant. >> yeah, there are hundreds of companies in the advertising game, and they could drop a cookie saying this person is searching pregnancy. >> if you
be the only ones that have access to the missile technology, may be being discovered at this time. but these types of chemical weapons are not very, very difficult to manufacture. >> syrian state t.v. is reporting the military have found chemical weapons in rebel-controlled tunnels in the damaskas neighborhood of joba. syria's biggest ally russia said they may allow the investigators to visit. but there seems little movement in moscow's stanchion. >> the shift is small. there is no indication that should western kuntz trees or the u.s. or a group or coalition of the willing once again intervene in the military fashion, even in a limited way, there there is no indication that russia might be even slightly cooperative this time. >> barack obama's security advisors are meeting at the whitehouse over the weekend. the united nations disarmament chief has arrived in syria and is trying to negotiate chemical weapons inspectors to visit the site. charles stratford, al jazeera. >> the situation in syria means a working weekend at the whitehouse. president obama has been meeting with his na
with hp to build the new nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. ♪ >>> a few weeks back, the huffington post ran a piece on a mom whose child was attacked by a large white southerner in walmart. don't say it, bob. he was wearing a pink bow. put him in a head lock, said the child would die for such behavior. huffington post gulped it without chewing. not me. there was a long, detailed blog after the child was attacked by a homophobe in a walmart in the south. didn't seem right because for the left it seemed completely right. did sean penn produce this for al jazeera? they looked at the cameras. although mom was there, the incident wasn't. it was a hoax. the huffington post removed it hoping no one would notice. i was upset and no one got punished. a student was nailed for hate crimes at oberlin college that created a fire storm in the press. now it turns out he was in trouble. even though the actions are fake, the school says it doesn't matter because
and lengthen lives. nor can we stop investing in science and technology to train our young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow, and to act on what we learned about our bodies, our businesses, and our climate. we must push open those stubborn gates. we cannot be discouraged by a supreme court decision. >> the landscape is littered with dashed dreams and lost hopes of all races. the ironry is the future never brimmed with more possibilities. it has never burned brighter in what we could become. if we push open those stubborn gates. and if we do it together. the choice remains as it was on that distant summer day 50 years ago, cooperate and thrive or fight with each other and fall behind. we should all thank god for dr. king and john lewis, and all those who gave us a dream to guide us, a dream they made for like our founders with their lives, their fortunes, their sacred honor. and we thank them for reminding us that america is always becoming, always on a journey, and we all, every single citizen among us, have to run our lap. god bless them,ed , and god bles america. >> of course, for
costs and lengthen lives. nor can we stop investing in science and technology to train our young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow. and to act on what we learned about our bodies, our businesses, and our climate. we must push open those stubborn gates. we cannot be discouraged by a supreme court decision that said we don't need this critical provision in the voting rights act because, look at the states. it made it harder for african-americans and hispanics and students and the elderly and the infirmed and poor working folks to vote. what do you know? they showed up, stood in line for hours and voted anyway. so obviously we don't need any kind of law. [ applause ] but a great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon. we must open those stubborn gates. and let us not forget that while racial divides persist and must not be denied, the whole american landscape is littered with the lost dreams and dashed hopes of people of all races. and the great irony of the current moment is that the future has never brimmed with more possibilities. it has never
in science and technology to train our young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow and to act on what we learn about our bodies, our businesses, and our climate. we must push open those stubborn gates. we cannot be discouraged by a supreme court decision that said we don't need this critical provision of the voting rights act because look at the states. it made it harder for african-americans and hispanics and students and the elderly and the infirm and poor working folks to vote. what do you know? they showed up, stood in line for hours, and voted anyway, so obviously we don't need any kind of law. but a great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon. we must open those stubborn gates and let us not forget that while racial divides persist and must not be denied, the whole american landscape is littered with the lost dreams and dashed hopes of people of all races. and the great irony of the current moment is that the future has never brimmed with more possibilities. it has never burned brighter in what we could become if we push open those stubborn gate
the economy has changed. the twin forces of technology and global competition have subtracted those jobs that once provide foot hold into the middle class. reduced the bargaining power of american workers. our politics has suffered. entrenched interests, those who benefit from an unjust status quo resisted any government efforts to give working families a fair deal. martialing an army of lobbyists and opinion makers to argue that taxes on the wealthy who could afford just to fund crumbling schools that all these things violated sound economic principles. we be told that growing inequality was a price for a growing economy. a measure of a free market. that greed was good. and compassion ineffective. and those without jobs or health care had only themselves to blame. then there were those elected officials who found it useful to practice the old politics of division, doing their best to convince middle class americans of a great untruth that government was somehow itself to blame for their growing economic insecurity. that distant bureaucrats were taking their hard earned dollars to benefi
start in 2016. >> some doctors saying technology could affect children's sleeping habits. more and more children have access to smart phones, tablets and tvs. doctors say that most of the children using the technologies are getting less than the recommended hours of sleep. study shows poor sleep is connected to poor academic performance. him he are constantly plugged in. they want to know what's going on and they have this need to let everybody else know what's going on. >> what stage of sleep. >> they say school age children need ten hours of sleep and teens need eight. they recommend parents shut down the devices at least one hour before bed. >> a popular pub in the county is using social media as it's new bouncer. the owner of finnegan's is using facebook to screen his patrons. the only way to get in after nine is to be a facebook friend of the pub. the owner said it's a way to avoid problems. patrons say they couldn't be happier with the new process. >> for the most part there is not a lot of trouble here because people know they can be identified. >> the atmosphere has been go
that dominate nasdaq are big technology names and names you have written extensively about and the microsofts and the googles and on and on. they were kind of frozen in time as trading was all but halted. i am wondering whether it affects them, as well. interest in those stocks if there is a sense that, you know, you can't always trade them cleanly, whatever. >> i think this points up the pros and the cons of technology. technology has really lowered the barriers for all sorts of investors to be able to trade. but it doesn't, when it goes down, it really goes down. you know the pits are not going to go down like that. i think charlie is absolutely right. the sec has totally failed here. the nasdaq needs to have a fail-safe system. they, obviously, don't. they shouldn't be allowed to operate until they do. >> you know, ben stein, i do remember the days when you look at the floor of the new york stock exchange crowded with people and now tumble weeds. nicole and like a couple of guys. i'm just wondering, what has happened and is that the problem. have we taken the human out of it and made it so
march encouraged other people to do the same thing. secondly the technological change from satellite to television and video screens and sophisticated sound systems have made marchs more accessible just more feasible. you see this cascading number of marchs to the point where -- martin luther king historian said the type has been debased by repetition. host: obviously a significant difference as we have listened to a number of oral histories. the organizational work it took to put this march together with more than 250,000, that was of course well before e-mail and twitter and other social media. this is truly a grassroots efforts. lot as changed in terms of technology. has that impacted the value of these marchs? guest: certainly the value has been has beened considerably. king's speech was carried by the satellite to nations around the world and broadcast live the only three broadcast networks. today it would take an enormous event to get that kind of attention. the technology is there to spread your message. people attention span various reasons has been so changed you really ha
conscious. it is time to my wise -- mob ilize those technologies, to change the fundamental construct on on which our nation was built. we asserted a quality -- equality, but we built this on inequality. as we go forward into the 21st century, we ask, as the w.k. kellogg foundation, to move beyond rhetoric and beyond denial. publication last week that suggested that we are contrary to a post-racial less than half of whites actually believe we have made a lot of ryegrass toward -- toward dr. king's dream. that means that some of us are moving past denial of the work that remains to be done. and a lot of us are moving past denial. once we passed the dial of fact fact, we must move past the denial of fact, of the consequences, of the feelings. i want to tell you a buried brief story of when i was 13 -- a very brief story of when i was about 13 rate -- 13. i lived in an area that was all white, and they brought in colored kids from all over the country. it was my first exposure to different backgrounds. my roommate was another young woman from my town. we got along famously. at the end of
also held top positions at the massachusetts institute of technology and the george washington university. right,-- to my far andrew young, an aide to martin luther king. young helped organize the march on washington. in addition he was a former congressman, a former mayor of atlanta, and a former ambassador to the united issues. he is currently professor at the andrew young skill -- school of policy studies at georgia state. ifill,eft, gwen reporter, moderator and managing "washington week vicehe has moderated two presidential debates, and before that she worked for nbc, and "the washington post," and she is regarded as one of the best. my right, julian bond, one of the leaders of the civil rights movement. studentd found the nonviolent coordinating committee. he was also elected to the georgia house and senate. he has been a radio and television almond tater and is a professor at both american university and the university of virginia. , a manmmediate left described as the conscience of the u.s. congress among john lewis, a congressman from georgia since 1986. at 23, 1 of the
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